Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) and Microwave remote sensing – What to do when measurements are affected by RFI?

Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) and Microwave remote sensing - What to do when measurements are affected by RFI?

Webinar Speaker: Roger Oliva, FARS-TC / Zenithal Blue Technologies (ZBT)

Roger Oliva

About the Webinar

Passive microwave remote sensing microwave satellites are experiencing more and more instances of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI). RFI leads to data loss in measurements acquired over areas affected by interference, or, worse, it leads to wrong retrievals of the geophysical parameters.

This seminar will explore the practices to deal with RFI present in Earth Observation (EO) data, as suggested by the Frequency Allocation in Remote Sensing Technical Committee (FARS-TC) of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS). The proposed process consists of six steps:

  1. Understanding of the regulatory aspects of the satellite data
  2. Reporting of illegal RFI emissions
  3. Involvement in the regulatory process to protect EO frequency bands
  4. Definition of the needs of your application and the EO data
  5. Application of suitable RFI detection/cancellation techniques
  6. Monitoring of the quality of the data.


Each of these steps will be explained in detail during the seminar, with the end goal of mitigating the prejudicial effects of RFI in the EO data as much as possible.

Speakers’ Bio

Roger Oliva is the co-chair of the Frequency Allocation in Remote Sensing Technical Committee (FARS-TC) of the IEEE GRSS. He is also the founder and CEO of Zenithal Blue Technologies (ZBT), a consulting company located in Barcelona, Spain that provides services to the European Space Agency (ESA). Zenithal Blue Technologies is specialised in engineering services for microwave remote sensors and in the management of Radio Frequency interference for Earth Observation satellites. Roger Oliva obtained a M.Sc degree in Telecommunication Engineering from the Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Spain in 2004. He has many years of professional experience dedicated to the Earth Explorer satellite SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Sallinty). He is the prime coordinator between ESA and its external engineering and scientific support laboratories, including the Calibration and Level 1 processing team. In 2013, Roger Oliva received the Certificate of Appreciation from the IEEE GRSS FARS Committee (the same committee he is now co-chairing) for his successful efforts in working with national authorities in removing radio-frequency interference sources from the protected 14000-1427 MHz EESS band.

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