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Welcome!

The Front Range Chapter of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society was established in 2011 to serve GRSS members and the general public interested in geoscience and remote sensing in the Denver Colorado (USA) region and beyond. Please contact the Chapter Chair if you would like more information or are interested in presenting a technical s seminar at one of our chapter meetings. Our meetings are open to the general public; you do not need to be a member of IEEE/GRSS to present or attend.

Chapter Officers

Chapter Chair:  W. Neill Kefauver, Lockheed Martin Space Systems
Chapter Vice-Chair:  William Emery,  University of Colorado at Boulder
Chapter Secretary: Thomas Kampe, NEON Inc., Boulder, Colorado
Chapter Treasurer:: David Newell, Ball Aerospace & Technologies,  Boulder, Colorado
Webmaster: Valery Zavorotny, NOAA/ESRL, Boulder Colorado; Vladimir Irisov, Spire, Boulder, Colorado

Upcoming Meetings

October 24, 2017

IEEE Joint MTT/APS/GRSS Denver Chapter Meeting, sponsored by Lockheed Martin.

Prof. Christopher Ruf, The University of Michigan


NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) Earth Venture Mission

  • Time: 6:00 PM Refreshments / 6:30 PM Talk
  • Location: Room W120 Space Science Bldg, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder; Colorado. Please see online map.

  • The NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is a spaceborne mission successfully launched on December 15, 2016 with a goal to study tropical cyclone (TC) inner core processes. CYGNSS attempts to resolve one of the principle deficiencies with current TC intensity forecasts, which lies in inadequate observations and modeling of the inner core. The inadequacy in observations results from two causes: 1) Much of the inner core ocean surface is obscured from conventional remote sensing instruments by intense precipitation in the eye wall and inner rain bands. 2) The rapidly evolving (genesis and intensification) stages of the TC life cycle are poorly sampled in time by conventional polar-orbiting, wide-swath surface wind imagers. CYGNSS address these limitations by combining the all-weather performance of GNSS bistatic ocean surface scatterometry with the sampling properties of a constellation of satellites.

    The CYGNSS constellation is comprised of 8 observatories in 510 km circular orbits at a common inclination angle of 35°. Each observatory contains a Delay Doppler Mapping Instrument (DDMI) which consists of a multi-channel GPS receiver, a low gain zenith antenna and two high gain nadir antennas. Each DDMI measures simultaneous specular scattered signals from the 4 GPS transmitters with the highest probable signal-to-noise ratio. CYGNSS measurements of bistatic radar cross section of the ocean can be related to the near surface wind speed, in a manner roughly analogous to that of conventional ocean scatterometers and altimeters. CYGNSS has spatial and temporal sampling properties that are different from conventional wide-swath polar imagers. Spatial sampling is marked by 32 simultaneous single pixel -Y´swaths¡ that are 25 km wide and, typically, 100s of km long. The temporal sampling is best described by a probability distribution of the revisit time, with a median and mean values of ~3 and ~7 hours, respectively.

    A summary of the mission will be presented, including the DDMI science payload, the spacecraft, the constellation orbital architecture, the mission concept of operations, the wind speed retrieval algorithm. and recent observations during the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season.

    Biography:

    Chris Ruf is currently Professor of Atmospheric Science and Electrical Engineering at the University of Michigan. He has worked previously at Intel Corporation, Hughes Space and Communication, the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Penn State University. He is Principal Investigator of the NASA CYGNSS Mission. Dr. Ruf has been involved in microwave remote sensing for 33+ years, with a research emphasis on spaceborne microwave sensor design and calibration and the development and validation of ocean and atmosphere geophysical retrieval algorithms. He has contributed to the science, cal/val and engineering teams for TOPEX, GeoSat Follow On, Jason-1, SMOS, WindSat, Aquarius, GPM, SMAP and Juno. Prof. Ruf is a Fellow of the IEEE and former Editor-in-Chief of the Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. He has been the recipient of four NASA Certificates of Recognition and seven NASA Group Achievement Awards, as well as the 1997 IEEE TGRS Best Paper Award, the 1999 IEEE Resnik Technical Field Award, the 2006 IGARSS Best Paper Award, and the 2014 IEEE GRSS Outstanding Service Award.

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    TBD

    Valery Zavorotny, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado.

    Remote sensing using GNSS bistatic radar of opportunity

  • Location: Boulder; Colorado. Please see online map.

  • In the past decade there has been considerable interest in using signals of opportunity such as those from Global Navigation Satellite Systems for remote sensing of ocean, land, snow and ice. GNSS-reflected signals, after being received and processed by the airborne or spaceborne receiver, are available as delay correlation waveforms or as delay-Doppler maps. These bistatic signals collected from the ocean surface can be used for altimetric or wind-scatterometric purposes complimenting traditional monostatic radar techniques. Similarly, information about soil moisture, snow depth and vegetation can be inferred from GNSS reflected signals. The existing research has shown that GNSS reflectometry has the potential to be a low-cost, wide-coverage technique for studying Earth’s environmental processes.

    In the first part of the talk an overview will be given to above applications of GNSS bistatic reflectometry, whereas in the second part of the talk will focus on the measurements of ocean surface roughness, wind speed and direction using both aircraft and orbital bistatic radars. A theoretical forward model which relates the delay-Doppler map to the bistatic radar cross section, and then to statistical characteristics of the wind-driven waves will be discussed. Algorithms to retrieve wind speed and wind direction using delay-Doppler maps processed from the data collected by the GPS software receiver onboard the NOAA Gulfstream-IV jet aircraft will be demonstrated. Finally, experiments in current and future spaceborne GNSS bistatic radar missions such as the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) mission will be discussed

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    Previous Meetings

    September 27, 2017

    IEEE Joint MTT/APS/GRSS Denver Chapter Meeting, sponsored by Lockheed Martin.

    Prof. Branislav Notaros


    Higher Order Computational Electromagnetics and Its Applications in RF Design, MRI, and Meteorology

  • Time: 6:00 PM Refreshments / 6:30 PM Talk
  • Location: 1350 Pleasant Drive, Boulder; Colorado. Please see online map.

  • This meeting will examine the research at Colorado State University (CSU), particularly that led by Prof. Branislav Notaros. The meeting is joint between GRSS, APS and MTT because the disciplines discussed are shared between these societies. A box meal will be provided to registrants

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    April 7, 2015

    Professor Ignasi Corbella, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Barcelona, Spain and Visiting Scientist, CET, University of Colorado at Boulder
    The SMOS mission: Challenge and Success

  • Time: 6:30 PM Refreshments / 7:00 PM Talk
  • Location: Boulder; Colorado. Please see online map.
  • More Details
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    November 6, 2013

    GRSS Front Range Chapter EXCOM Organizational Meeting

  • Time: 18h00-19h00
  • Location: Boulder; Colorado. Please see online map.
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    October 16, 2013

    Michael D. King, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado Boulder
    Remote Sensing of the Earth’s Environment from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

  • Time: 6:00 PM Refreshments / 6:30 PM Talk
  • Location: Boulder; Colorado. Please see online map.
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    April 11, 2011

    Thomas Kampe, NEON  Inc., Boulder, Colorado
    The Role of Airborne Remote Sensing in the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON)

  • Time: 7:00 PM Refreshments / 7:30 PM Talk
  • Location: Discovery Learning Center (DLC) 1st Floor Meeting Room - University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado. Please see online map.
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