Distinguished Achievement Award


About the Award
The Distinguished Achievement Award was established to recognize an individual who has made significant technical contributions, within the scope of GRSS, usually over a sustained period. In selecting the individual, the factors considered are quality, significance and impact of the contributions; quantity of the contributions; duration of significant activity; papers published in archival journals; papers presented at conferences and symposia; patents granted; and advancement of the profession. IEEE membership is preferable but not required. The award is considered annually and presented only if a suitable candidate is identified. The awardee receives a plaque and a certificate.

The Award Recipient


Prof. Roger H. Lang from the George Washington University, Washington, D.C., USA

For innovative and continuing contributions to the theory of microwave models for remote sensing, propagation and measurements, and his service to the community.
Roger Lang with IEEE President
Peter Staecker.

Roger H. Lang received his education at the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (now Polytechnic Institute at New York University) and earned a Ph.D. in Electrophysics. He did post-doctoral work on wave propagation in random medium at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University under JB Keller, and then joined the George Washington University where he became a Professor and was awarded the L. Stanley Crane Chair.

Roger Lang’s research has focused on microwave remote sensing and wave propagation, and especially the effect of vegetation on remote sensing. He was the first to employ the Distorted Born Approximation, in conjunction with the discrete scatter model, to describe the effects of a vegetation canopy. This was significant because it was fully consistent with Maxwell’s equations and related the scattering and propagation to physical quantities of the canopy (e.g. the biophysical characteristics of leaves, stems and branches). The theory provided a systematic treatment of the double bounce contribution from vegetation which is important in the measurement of soil moisture and vegetation biomass. In 1989 Professor Lang was elected a Fellow of the IEEE based in large part on this work.

Dr. Lang, along with his students and collaborators, applied the Distorted Born methodology in numerous NASA field campaigns. Many of these measurements involved a radar/ radiometer now known as ComRAD that he built in conjunction with NASA/GSFC. In all of these campaigns careful biophysical measurements of vegetation were made to help understand how models and measurements compared. Dr. Lang has made dielectric measurements of vegetation components and more recently has been involved in making measurements of the dielectric constant of seawater for the Aquarius project.

Dr. Lang has been an active participate in IEEE GRSS. He has served on the GRSS AdCom and has been an associate editor of TGARS for many years. He served as Co-Technical Chair of IGARSS 1991, and more recently was the Chair of MicroRad 2010. Dr. Lang is also active in URSI where he is presently the Chair of International URSI Commission F. He has over 200 journal and conference papers.


Education Award

About the Award
The GRSS Education Award was established to recognize an individual who has made significant educational contributions in terms of the innovation and extent of its overall impact. A certificate may be presented for recognized contributions to education in geoscience and/or remote sensing. The awardee(s) must be either member(s) or affiliates of the GRSS. The award shall be considered annually, but only awarded when an outstanding recipient is identified.

The Award Recipient

Kamal Sarabandi (right) receives the  
IEEE GRSS Eduction Award from GRSS  
President Melba Crawford.

Kamal Sarabandi (S’87-M’90-SM’92-F’00) received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran, in 1980, the M.S. degree in electrical engineering in 1986, and the M.S. degree in mathematics and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in 1989.

He is currently the Director of the Radiation Laboratory and the Rufus S. Teesdale Professor of Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. His research areas of interest include microwave and millimeter-wave radar remote sensing, Meta-materials, electromagnetic wave propagation, and antenna miniaturization. He possesses 25 years of experience with wave propagation in random media, communication channel model- ing, microwave sensors, and radar systems and leads a large research group including two research scientists, 16 Ph.D. students. He has graduated 40 Ph.D. and supervised numerous post-doctoral students. He has served as the Principal Investigator on many projects sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Army Research Office (ARO), Office of Naval Research (ONR), Army Research Laboratory (ARL), National Science Foundation (NSF), Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and a large number of industries. Currently he is leading the Center for Microelectronics and Sensors funded by the Army Research Laboratory under the Micro-Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) Collaborative Technology Alliance (CTA) program.

He has published many book chapters and more than 220 papers in refereed journals on miniaturized and on-chip antennas, meta-materials, electromagnetic scattering, wireless channel modeling, random media modeling, microwave measurement techniques, radar calibration, inverse scattering problems, and microwave sensors. He has also had more than 500 papers and invited presentations in many national and international conferences and symposia on similar subjects.

Dr. Sarabandi served as a member of NASA Advisory Council appointed by the NASA Administrator for two consecutive terms from 2006–2010. He is serving as a vice president of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) and is a member of the Editorial Board of the Proceedings of the IEEE. He was an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation and the IEEE Sensors Journal. He is a member of Commissions F and D of URSI. Dr. Sarabandi was the recipient of the Henry Russel Award from the Regent of The University of Michigan. In 1999 he received a GAAC Distinguished Lecturer Award from the German Federal Ministry for Education, Science, and Technology. He was also a recipient of the 1996 EECS Department Teaching Excellence Award and a 2004 College of Engineering Research Excellence Award. In 2005 he received the IEEE GRSS Distinguished Achievement Award and the University of Michigan Faculty Recognition Award. He also received the best paper Award at the 2006 Army Science Conference. In 2008 he was awarded a Humboldt Research Award from The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation of Germany and received the best paper award at the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium. He was also awarded the 2010 Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award from the University of Michigan. The IEEE Board of Directors announced him as the recipient of the 2011 IEEE Judith A. Resnik medal. In the past several years, joint papers presented by his students at a number of international symposia (IEEE APS’95,’97,’00,’01,’03, ’05,’06,’07; IEEE IGARSS’99,’02,’07;’11 IEEE IMS’01, USNC URSI’04,’05,’06,’10,’11 AMTA ’06, URSI GA 2008) have received best paper awards.


Transactions Prize Paper Award

About the Award
The GRSS established the Transactions Prize Paper Award to recognize authors who have published an exceptional paper in IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing during the past calendar year. When selecting the paper, other factors considered are originality and clarity of the paper. The Award consists of a Certificate and an honorarium of $3000, equally divided between the authors.

The Winning Paper
Thomas Meissner and Frank J. Wentz, “The Emissivity of the Ocean Surface between 6 and 90 GHz over a Large Range of Wind Speeds and Earth Incidence Angles,” IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Vol. 50, No. 8, pp. 3004–3026, August 2012.

About the Authors

Thomas Meissner (left) and Frank J. 
Wentz with Society President
Melba Crawford.

Thomas Meissner (M’02, SM’13) received the B.S. in physics from the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany, in 1983, the M.S. (Diploma) in physics from the University of Bonn, Germany, in 1987 and the Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of Bochum, Germany, in 1991. Between 1992 and 1998 he conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Washington, Seattle, WA, the University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, and at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, in Theoretical Nuclear and Particle Physics. In 1998, he joined Remote Sensing Systems (RSS), Santa Rosa, CA. Since then, he has been working on the development and refinement of radiative transfer models, calibration, validation and ocean retrieval algorithms for various microwave instruments (SSM/I, TMI, AMSR-E, WindSat, CMIS, SSMIS, GMI, AQUARIUS).

Dr. Meissner has been serving on the review panel for the National Academies’ Committee on Radio Frequencies (CORF). As member of the AQUARIUS Launch, Early Orbit Operations and Commissioning Team he has been recognized with the NASA Group Achievement Award in 2012.

Frank J. Wentz has a B.S. (1969) and M.S. (1971) in physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1974, he established Remote Sensing Systems, a research company specializing in satellite microwave remote sensing of the Earth. His past research focused on radiative transfer models that relate satellite observations to geophysical parameters, with the objective of providing reliable geophysical data sets to the Earth science community. As a member of NASA’s SeaSat Experiment Team (1978–1982), he pioneered the development of physically based retrieval methods for microwave scatterometers and radiometers. Starting in 1987, he took the lead on providing the worldwide research community with high-quality ocean products derived from satellite microwave imagers (SSM/I). As the president of RSS, he oversees the production and validation of climate-quality satellite products. These data are dispersed via the company’s web and FTP sites.

He is currently a member of NASA Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) Team, NASA Ocean Vector Wind Science (OVWST) Team, the AQUARIUS Launch, Early Orbit Operations and Commissioning Team and NASA REASoN DISCOVER Project. He has served on many NASA review panels, the National Research Council’s Earth Studies Board, the National Research Council’s Panel on Reconciling Temperature Observations. He is a Lead Author for CCSP Synthesis and Assessment Product on Temperature Trends in the Lower Atmosphere. He is currently working on scatterometer/radiometer combinations, satellite-derived decadal time series of atmospheric moisture and temperature, the measurement of sea-surface temperature through clouds, and advanced microwave sensor designs for climatological studies.

Mr. Wentz is Fellow Member of the American Geophysical Union. As member of the AQUARIUS Launch, Early Orbit Operations and Commissioning Team he has been recognized with the NASA Group Achievement Award in 2012.


Letters Prize Paper Award

About the Award
The GRSS established the Letters Prize Paper Award to recognize the author(s) who has published in the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters during the previous calendar year an exceptional paper in terms of content and impact on the GRS Society. If a suitable paper cannot be identified from among those published during the calendar year, papers published in prior years, and subsequently recognized as being meritorious, may be considered. When selecting the paper, originality, impact, scientific value and clarity are factors considered. Prize: Certificate and $1500, equally divided between the authors.

The Winning Paper

Luis Gómez-Chova, Luis Robert Jenssen, and Gustavo Camps-Valls entitled “Kernel Entropy Component Analysis for Remote Sensing Image Clustering,” IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, Vol. 9, No. 2, pp. 312–316, March 2012.

About the Authors

Luis Gómez-Chova (left) and
Gustavo Camps-Valls with Society 
President Melba Crawford.

Luis Gómez-Chova (S’08–M’09) received the B.Sc. (with first-class honors), M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees in electronics engineering from the University of Valencia, Spain, in 2000, 2002, and 2008, respectively. He is currently an associate professor at the Department of Electronics Engineering and researcher at the Image Processing Laboratory in the University of Valencia. He has completed different research stays at the European Space Research Institute (ESRIN) of the European Space Agency (Jul–Dec 2003), the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Munich (Jul–Sep 2004), the Università Degli Studi di Trento in Italy (Jun–Aug 2007), and the Technical University of Denmark (DTU-Space) in Copenhagen (Jul–Aug 2010). His work is mainly related to pattern recognition and machine learning applied to remote sensing multispectral images and cloud screening. He conducts and supervises research on these topics within the framework of several national and international projects. He is the author of more than 30 international journal papers, more than 90 international conference papers, and several international book chapters. He is a also referee of many international journals and serves on the program committees of several international conferences.

Dr. Gómez-Chova was awarded by the Spanish Ministry of Education with the National Award for Electronic Engineering. He has been the recipient of the 2008 European Best IEEE GRSS PhD Thesis Award, as well as the 2008 Best PhD Thesis Award of the Spanish Chapter of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS). His paper “Kernel Entropy Component Analysis for Remote Sensing Image Clustering” was the Editor’s Choice Paper of the March 2012 issue of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters.

Robert Jenssen received the degree of Dr. Scient. (Ph.D.) in Electrical Engineering in 2005 from the University of Tromsø (UiT), Norway, where he is currently an associate professor at the Department of Physics and Technology. Jenssen is also a research professor at the Norwe- gian Center for Telemedicine and Integrated Care. Jenssen was a visiting guest researcher at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU Compute, Cognitive Systems Section with L. K. Hansen) 2012/2013, at the Technical University of Berlin, 2008/2009 (Machine Learning Group with K.-R. Muller) and at the University of Florida, 2002/2003 and March/April 2004 (Computational NeuroEngineering Laboratory with J.C. Principe). In his research, he has focused on developing an information theoretic approach to machine learning based on Renyi entropy, with strong connections to Mercer kernel methods and to spectral clustering and dimensionality reduction methods. Jenssen received “Honorable Mention for the 2003 Pattern Recognition Journal Best Paper Award,” the “2005 IEEE ICASSP Outstanding Student Paper Award” and the “2007 UiT Young Investigator Award.” His paper “Kernel Entropy Component Analysis” was the Featured Paper of the May 2010 issue of IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, and the paper “Kernel Entropy Component Analysis for Remote Sensing Image Clustering,” co-authored by Jenssen, was the Editor’s Choice Paper of the March 2012 issue of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters. Jenssen served on the IEEE Signal Processing Society’s Machine Learning for Signal Processing Technical Committee 2006–2009, and is currently an Associate Editor of the journal Pattern Recognition.

Gustavo Camps-Valls (M’04, SM’07) received a Ph.D. degree in Physics (2002, summa cum laude) from the Universitat de València, Spain, where he is currently an Associate Professor in the Electrical Engineering Dept. He teaches time series analysis, image processing, machine learning, and knowledge extraction for remote sensing. His research is conducted as Group Leader of the Image and Signal Processing (ISP) group, http://isp.uv.es, of the same university. He has been Visiting Researcher at the Remote Sensing Laboratory (Univ. Trento, Italy) in 2002, the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics (Tübingen, Germany) in 2009, and as Invited Professor at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Lausanne, Switzerland) in 2013. His research interests are tied to the development of machine learning algorithms for signal and image processing with special focus on remote sensing data analysis. He conducts and supervises research within the frameworks of several national and international projects, and he is Evaluator of project proposals and scientific organizations. He is the author (or co-author) of 95 international peer-reviewed journal papers, more than 120 international conference papers, 20 international book chapters, and editor of the books “Kernel methods in bio-engineering, signal and image processing” (IGI, 2007), “Kernel methods for remote sensing data analysis” (Wiley & Sons, 2009), and “Remote Sensing Image Processing” (MC, 2011). He’s a co-editor of the forthcoming book “Digital Signal Processing with Kernel Methods” (Wiley & Sons, 2014). He holds a Hirsch’s index h = 28, entered the ISI list of Highly Cited Researchers in 2011, and he is a co-author of the 3 most highly cited papers in relevant remote sensing journals. Thomson Reuters identified one of his papers as a Fast Moving Front research. He is a referee of many international journals and conferences, and currently serves on the Program Committees of International Society for Optical Engineers (SPIE) Europe, International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), Machine Learning for Signal Processing (MLSP), and International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP) among others. In 2007 he was elevated to IEEE Senior Member, and since 2007 he is member of the Data Fusion technical committee of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society, and since 2009 he is member of the Machine Learning for Signal Processing Technical Committee of the IEEE Signal Processing Society. He is member of the MTG-IRS Science Team (MIST) of the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT). He is Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, IEEE Signal Processing Letters, IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, ISRN Signal Processing Journal, and Guest Editor of IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Signal Processing.


J-STARS Prize Paper Award

About the Award

The GRSS established the J-STARS Prize Paper Award to recognize the author(s) who published in the IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing during the previous calendar year an exceptional paper in terms of content and impact on the GRS Society. When selecting the paper, other factors considered are originality, clarity and timeliness of the paper. IEEE membership is preferable. The Award consists of a Certificate and an honorarium of $1,500. If the paper has more than one author, the honorarium shall be shared.

The Winning Paper
Salman Saeed Khan and Raffaella Guida, “On Single-Look Multivariate G Distribution for PolSAR Data,” IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, Vol. 5, No. 4, pp. 1149–1163, August 2012.

About the Authors

Salman Saeed Khan with Society 
President Melba Crawford.

Salman Saeed Khan (S’11) was born in 1982 in Lahore, Pakistan. He received the B.S. degree in Computer Sciences from National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences, Pakistan in 2004, the M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering as a Fulbright scholar from University of Central Florida, Orlando, U.S.A. in 2009, and is currently in the fourth year of Ph.D. degree in Electronics Engineering (Remote Sensing Applications group) at the Surrey Space Centre, University of Surrey in Guildford, U.K. His current research interests include Statistical Signal Processing in polarimetric SAR, and its applications in Pattern Recognition and Target Detection.

Raffaella Guida (S’04–M’08) was born in Naples, Italy, on October 24, 1975. She received the Laurea degree (cum laude) in Telecommunications Engineering and the Ph.D. degree in Electronic and Telecommunications Engineering from the University of Naples Federico II, Naples, in 2003 and 2007, respectively. In 2003, she received a grant from the University of Naples Federico II to be spent at the Department of Electronic and Telecommunication Engineering (DIET) for research in the field of remote sensing. In 2006, she received a two-year grant from the University of Naples Federico II to be spent at DIET for research in electromagnetics, particularly on the topic of electromagnetic field propagation in an urban environment, within the Italian project S.Co.P.E. In 2006, she was also a Guest Scientist with the Department of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. In 2008, she joined the Surrey Space Centre (SSC), University of Surrey, Guildford, U.K., as Lecturer in Satellite Remote Sensing. Today she is still in SSC where she leads the Remote Sensing Applications group. Her main research interests are in the fields of electromagnetics and microwave remote sensing, particularly in simulation and modeling of synthetic aperture radar signals relevant to natural surfaces and urban scenes, new remote sensing mission concepts and applications. She is involved as PI and co-I in many national and European research projects.


Highest Impact Paper Award


About the Award

The GRSS established the GRSS Highest Impact Paper Award to recognize the author(s) who has published during the past five years in an IEEE GRSS Journal the scientific paper that has received the highest number of citations and impact over the past five years as measured by the Thomson Reuters Web of Science citation index. A previously selected paper shall not be eligible for this award in the following years. The Award consists of a Certificate and an honorarium of $3,000. If the paper has more than one author, the honorarium shall be shared.

The Winning Paper
Mathieu Fauvel, Jon Atli Benediktsson, Jocelyn Chanussot, and Johannes R. Sveinsson, “Spectral and Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Data using SVMs and Morphological Profiles,” IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Vol. 46, No. 11, pp. 3804–3814, November 2008.

About the Authors

Mathieu Fauvel graduated in electrical engineering from the Grenoble Institute of Technology (Grenoble INP), Grenoble, France, in 2004. He received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in image and signal processing from the Grenoble INP in 2004 and 2007, respectively. In 2007, he was a teaching assistant in Grenoble INP. From 2008 to 2010, he was a postdoctoral research associate with the MISTIS Team of the National Institute for Research in Computer Science and Control (INRIA). Since 2010, Dr. Fauvel has been an Assistant Professor with the National Polytechnic Institute of Toulouse (ENSAT—University of Toulouse) within the DYNAFOR lab (University of Toulouse—INRA). His research interests are remote sensing, data fusion, pattern recognition, multi-component signal and image processing.

Jocelyn Chanussot (left) and
Jon Atli Benediktsson with
Society President Melba Crawford. 

Jón Atli Benediktsson received the Cand. Sci. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Iceland, Reykjavik, in 1984, and the M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. degrees from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 1987 and 1990, respectively. He is currently Pro Rector for Academic Affairs and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Iceland. His research interests are in remote sensing, biomedical analysis of signals, pattern recognition, image processing, and signal processing, and he has published extensively in those fields. Prof. Benediktsson was the 2011–2012 President of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) and has been on the GRSS AdCom since 2000. He was Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (TGRS) from 2003 to 2008 and has served as Associate Editor of TGRS since 1999 and the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters since 2003. He was the Chairman of the Steering Committee of IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing (J-STARS) 2007–2010. Prof. Benediktsson is a co-founder of the biomedical start up company Oxymap (http://www.oxymap.com). He is a Fellow of the IEEE and a Fellow of SPIE. He received the Stevan J. Kristof Award from Purdue University in 1991 as outstanding graduate student in remote sensing. In 1997, Dr. Benediktsson was the recipient of the Icelandic Research Council’s Outstanding Young Researcher Award, in 2000, he was granted the IEEE Third Millennium Medal, in 2004, he was a co-recipient of the University of Iceland’s Technology Innovation Award, in 2006 he received the yearly research award from the Engineering Research Institute of the University of Iceland, and in 2007, he received the Outstanding Service Award from the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society. He is co-recipient of the 2012 IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing Paper Award. He is a member of Societas Scinetiarum Islandica and Tau Beta Pi.

Jocelyn Chanussot (M’04-SM’04-F’12) received the M.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from the Grenoble Institute of Technology (Grenoble INP), Grenoble, France, in 1995, and the Ph.D. degree from Savoie University, Annecy, France, in 1998. In 1999, he was with the Geography Imagery Perception Laboratory for the Delegation Generale de l’Armement (DGA—French National Defense Department). Since 1999, he has been with Grenoble INP, where he was an Assistant Professor from 1999 to 2005, an Associate Professor from 2005 to 2007, and is currently a Professor of signal and image processing. He is conducting his research at the Grenoble Images Speech Signals and Automatics Laboratory (GIPSA-Lab). His research interests include image analysis, multicomponent image processing, nonlinear filtering, and data fusion in remote sensing.

Dr. Chanussot is the founding President of IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing French chapter (2007–2010) which received the 2010 IEEE GRSS Chapter Excellence Award. He was the co-recipient of the NORSIG 2006 Best Student Paper Award, the IEEE GRSS 2011 Symposium Prize Paper Award, the IEEE GRSS 2012 Transactions Prize Paper Award and the IEEE GRSS 2013 Highest Impact Paper Award. He was a member of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society AdCom (2009–2010), in charge of membership development. He was the General Chair of the first IEEE GRSS Workshop on Hyperspectral Image and Signal Processing, Evolution in Remote Sensing (WHISPERS). He was the Chair (2009–2011) and Co-chair of the GRS Data Fusion Technical Committee (2005–2008). He was a member of the Machine Learning for Signal Processing Technical Committee of the IEEE Signal Processing Society (2006–2008) and the Program Chair of the IEEE International Workshop on Machine Learning for Signal Processing, (2009). He was an Associate Editor for the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters (2005–2007) and for Pattern Recognition (2006–2008). Since 2007, he is an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. Since 2011, he is the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing.

Johannes R. Sveinsson received the B.S. degree from the University of Iceland, Reykjavk, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada, all in Electrical Engineering. He is currently the Head and Professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iceland. He was with the Laboratory of Information Technology and Signal Processing from 1981 to 1982 and, from November 1991 to 1998, with the Engineering Research Institute as a Senior Member of the research staff and a Lecturer at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iceland. He was a Visiting Research Student with the Imperial College of Science and Technology, London, U.K., from 1985 to 1986. At Queen’s University, he held teaching and research assistantships. His current research interests are in systems and signal theory. Dr. Sveinsson received the Queens Graduate Awards from Queen’s University.


Symposium Prize Paper Award


About the Award
The GRSS established the Symposium Prize Paper Award to recognize the author(s) who presented at the IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS) an exceptional paper in terms of content and impact on the GRSS. In selecting the paper, other factors considered are originality, clarity and timeliness of the paper. The published versions of the papers in the Digest shall also be evaluated. Prize: Certificate and $1250, equally divided between the authors.

The Winning Paper
Yi Cui, Yoshio Yamaguchi, Hirokazu Kobayashi, and Jian Yang “Filtering of Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar Images: A Sequential Approach,” 2012 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, July 2012, in Munich, IGARSS’12 Proceedings.

About the Authors

Jian Yang (left), Yoshio Yamaguchi,
and Yi Cui with Society President 
Melba Crawford. 

Yi Cui (S’09–M’11) received the B.S. degree (with honors) in electronic information science and technology from Jilin University, Changchun, China, in 2006 and the Ph.D. degree in information and communication engineering from the Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, in 2011. He is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with Niigata University, Niigata, Japan. His research interests include SAR image processing, radar polarimetry, and electromagnetic theory. Dr. Cui is the first-prize winner of the student paper competition at the 2010 Asia-Pacific Radio Science Conference (AP-RASC’10), and a recipient of the best paper award of the 2012 International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation (ISAP’2012).

Yoshio Yamaguchi (M’83–SM’94–F’02) received the B.E. degree in electronics engineering from Niigata University in 1976, and the M.E. and Dr.Eng. Degrees from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, in 1978 and 1983, respectively. He joined the Faculty of Engineering, Niigata University in 1978. He is a Professor of Information Engineering, and Director of Main Library of the University. His interests are in the field of radar polarimetry, microwave sensing and imaging. He received IEEE GRSS 2008 Education Award. He has served as Chair of IEEE GRSS Japan Chapter (2002–03), Vice Chair (2000–01), Chair of URSI-F Japan (06–12). He had been serving as an associate editor of GRSS Newsletter, and Paper Award Committee member of IEEE GRS Society. He was a co-chair of the Technical Program Committee of IGARSS 2011. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electronics Information and Communication Engineers (IEICE), Japan. He has authored two books in Japanese, “Radar Polarimetry from Basics to Applications,” published by IEICE in 2007, and “Fundamentals of Polarimetric Radar and Its Applications,” published by Realize Inc. in 1998.

Hirokazu Kobayashi (M’87–SM’10) was born in Hokkaido, Japan. He received the B.E.E. and M.E.E. degrees from the Shizuoka University, Shizuoka, Japan, in 1978 and 1980, respectively, and received the Dr. Eng. degree from Tsukuba University, Tsukuba, Japan, in 2000. He joined Fujitsu LTD., Kawasaki, Japan in 1980. Since 1981 he has been with the Fujitsu System Integration Laboratories as a Researcher for development of micro- and millimeter-wave wide-band antennas and passive devices, active phased array radar, and electromagnetic theoretical investigation for scattering cross-sections. During 1999–2010, he served as a Director and General Manager of the Laboratories and Fujitsu LTD. In 2010 he joined the Faculty of Engineering as a Professor in Niigata University, Niigata, Japan. His current research interests are high-frequency electromagnetic analysis for computing of radar cross section of large objects, near-field analysis and imaging using PO/PTD/GTD, and near-field RCS transformation to far-field based on microwave imaging theory such as SAR and Inverse SAR.

Dr. Kobayashi is a Senior member of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society, and a member of the Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers, Japan. He was Adjunct Lecturer of Tsukuba University (2002–2004) and Tokyo Metropolitan University, Advanced Institute of Industrial Technology (2009–2010) and recently he published a book, “Electromagnetic Wave in Space,” Press-Media, Niigata, Japan (2011, in Japanese).

Jian Yang (M’98–SM’02) received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xian, China, in 1985 and 1990, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree from Niigata University, Niigata, Japan, in 1999. In 1985, he was with the Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University. From 1999 to 2000, he was an Assistant Professor with Niigata University. Since April 2000, he has been with the Department of Electronic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, where he is currently a Professor. His research interests include radar polarimetry, remote sensing, mathematical modeling, optimization in engineering, and fuzzy theory. Dr. Yang is the Chairman of the Institute of Electrical, Information, and Communication Engineers in Beijing and the Vice Chairman of the IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society, Beijing chapter.


Interactive Session Prize Paper Award


About the Award
The GRSS established the Interactive Session Prize Paper Award to recognize the author(s) who posted at the GRSS Symposium (IGARSS) an exceptional paper in terms of content and impact on the GRSS. When selecting the paper, other factors considered are originality, clarity and timeliness of the paper. The published versions of the papers in the Digest shall also be evaluated. Prize: Certificate and $1250, equally divided between the authors.

The Winning Paper
Spencer Farrar, Martín Labanda, María Marta Jacob, Sergio Masuelli, Sayak Biswas, Héctor Raimondo, and Linwood Jones, “An Empirical Correction for the MWR Brightness Temperature Smear Effect,” 2012 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, July 2012 in Munich, IGARSS’12 Proceedings.

About the Authors

Spencer Farrar (S’07) received the B.S. & M.S. degree in electrical engineering in 2008 & 2009 from the University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida. He is currently working toward the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering at the University of Central Florida. Since 2008, he has been a Graduate Research Assistant with the Central Florida Remote Sensing Laboratory, University of Central Florida. His past research within the satellite remote sensing field has been analysis on rainfall products, simulation of MWR Geophysical retrievals, Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) geophysical retrievals for 2010 GRIP flights. He has been involved in the GPM Intersatellite Calibration Working Group (X-CAL) performing satellite calibration on multiple satellites since Summer 2010. His current dissertation topic is Cold Sky Analysis of Spaceborne Microwave Radiometers.

Martín Labanda received his degree of Licenciate in Physics from the Faculty of Mathematics, Astronomy and Physics (FaMAF), National University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina in 2011. From 2009, he has been working at the Argentina Space Agency (Comisión Nacional de Actividades Espaciales, CONAE) as member of the SAC‐D Calibration Group. Within the satellite remote sensing field, he has been performing research on‐flight sensor calibration methodologies and radiative transfer modeling especially in microwave radiometry. Currently, he is contributing to the calibration of the microwave radiometer (MWR) and the infrared camera (NIRST).

Maria Marta Jacob received the Licenciate degree in Physics from the Facultad of Matemática, Astronomía y Física at the Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina, in 2009. She is currently a Visitor Research Scholar at Central Florida Remote Sensing Laboratory (CFRSL) at the University of Central Florida in Orlando, FL. In this position, she performs research in satellite microwave remote sensing, related to calibration and geophysical retrieval algorithm development from microwave radiometer data. Since 2009 she has been working at the Argentine Space Agency (Comisión Nacional de Actividades Espaciales, CONAE), where she contributed in the Flight Engineering Group of the SAC-D/ Aquarius Satellite and the Microwave Radiometer Inter-Satellite Radiometric Calibration (X-Cal) Working Group.

Sergio Masuelli received the B.S. degree and the Ph.D. in Physics from the UNC (Córdoba National University), in 1994 and 2000, respectively. Since 2009 he is CONAE’s system engineer working in the development of geophysical applications for this sensor, in special L2 and L3 Sea Ice products. In parallel he is an Associated Professor of the Master Program in Emergency Early Warning and Response Space Applications, at of the Gulich Institute (CONAE, UNC, ASI); he teaches graduate courses in Modelling, SAR Applications, Numerical Analysis and Emergency Applications.

From 1994 to 1998 he was a Ph.D. fellow in the Atmospheric Physics team of the Math, Astronomy and Physics faculty of the Córdoba National University. In his thesis he studied the role of electrical parameters in the cloud micro-physics and its influence in the cleaning of atmospheric pollutant, given contributions principally in numerical cloud modelling, electrification of clouds, and the collection efficiency of charged droplets and aerosols by hydrometeors under intense electric fields. From 1996 to 1998 he collaborated with the Air Quality Monitoring System of Córdoba city, developing a daily air pollution forecast.

From 1999 to 2005 he was an INVAP SA employee, working in the Teófilo Tabanera Space Center (CETT) of CONAE, as SAC-A mission operator, system production operator of satellite images, operation supervisor, support operation engineer. Additionally, he worked for the provision of images for emergency and the Charter for major disasters. From 2005 to 2007 he was Associate Professor of the Technologic National University, Concepción del Uruguay, teaching undergraduate courses in Physics and Numerical Analysis, and doing research on image processing and hydrological modeling.

Sayak K. Biswas (S’08-M’12) received the B.Tech. degree in electronics and communication engineering from the National Institute of Technology, Calicut, India, in 2005, and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Central Florida (UCF), Orlando, in 2009 and 2012, respectively.

He is currently a NASA Postdoctoral Fellow with the Earth Science Office at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. From 2008 to early 2012 he was with the Central Florida Remote Sensing Laboratory (CFRSL) at UCF, where he contributed in various research projects related to calibration of microwave radiometers and geo-physical retrieval algorithm development from microwave radiometer data. Prior to CFRSL, from 2005 to 2007 he worked as an Associate Systems Engineer at IBM India Private Limited in Pune, India.

Dr. Biswas is a recipient of the NASA Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Award for the proposal titled “Calibration and Image Reconstruction Algorithm Development for Hurricane Imaging Radiometer.”

Héctor Raimondo received B.S. degree of Engineer in Electronics and Electricity, awarded by the Universidad de Mendoza, Argentina in 1978. He is currently working at the Argentine Space Agency (Comisión Nacional de Actividades Espaciales, CONAE) as Coordinator of the Ground Segment and Applications Engineering Group. He is responsible for the coordination of the working groups for the development of the software that will carry out the routine processing (radiometric and geometric calibration) of the data generated by CoNAE instruments on board the Argentine SAC-D/Aquarius satellite. Since 1992 he has been working in CONAE, involved in several projects, such as the specification and design of the image acquisition software of the instruments MMRS & HTRC, both on board of the SAC-C satellite. Prior to this, he collaborated in the Airborne Multispectral Scanner Project (AMS) of the Comisión Nacional de Investigaciones Espaciales (CNIE) & the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt Luft und Raumfahrt e.V (DFVLR—German Space Agency). Héctor Raimondo has also been a professor of the Universidad Tecnológica Nacional—Facultad Regional Mendoza, since 1983.

Linwood Jones with Society 
President Melba Crawford. 

W. Linwood Jones (SM’75-F’99-LF’09) received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, VA in 1962, M.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA in 1965, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1971.

He is currently a professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. At UCF, he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in RF/MW communications, satellite remote sensing and radar systems. Also, he is the director of the Central Florida Remote Sensing Laboratory, where he performs research in satellite microwave remote sensing technology development. Prior to becoming a college professor in 1994, he had 27 years federal government employment with NASA at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA; at NASA Headquarters in Washington DC and at the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Further, he spent 8 years in the private aerospace industry with employment at General Electric’s Space Division in King of Prussia, PA and Harris Corp.’s Govt. Aerospace Systems Division in Melbourne, FL.

Prof. Jones is a Life Fellow of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society, Antennas and Propagation Society, and Oceanic Engineering Society; and a member of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and Commission F of the Union Radio Scientifique Internationale. For excellence in education, he received the IEEE Orlando Section: Outstanding Engineering Educator Award 2003, the College of Engineering: Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award 2004, the IEEE Florida Council: Outstanding Engineering Educator Award 2004 and the University of Central Fl Outstanding Graduate Student Mentor Award 2011. For his research, he received four NASA Special Achievement Awards, eight NASA Group Achievement Awards, the CNES Space Medal, the Aviation Week & Space Technology Space Program Award—1993, and the Naval Research Lab 2004 Alan Berman Research Publications Award.


Early Career Award


About the Award

The GRSS Early Career Award is to promote, recognize and support young scientists and engineers within the Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society that have demonstrated outstanding ability and promise for significant contributions in the future. Selection factors include quality, significance and impact of contributions, papers published in archival journals – papers presented at conferences and symposia, patents, demonstration of leadership, and advancement of profession. Previous award winners are ineligible. The Award consists of a Certificate and an honorarium of US$1,500.

The Winner

Carlos López-Martínez (right) exchanges
a few words with GRSS President Melba
Crawford after receiving the Early Career 
Award from her. IGARSS General Cochair
Simon Jones is in the background.
 

Carlos López-Martínez received the MSc. degree in electrical engineering and the Ph.D. degree from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain, in 1999 and 2003, respectively. From October 2000 to March 2002, he was with the Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik and Radar Systeme IHR, German Aerospace Center, DLR, Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. From June 2003 to December 2005, he has been with the Image and Remote Sensing Group—SAPHIR Team, in the Institute of Electronics and Telecommunications of Rennes (I.E.T.R.—CNRS UMR 6164), Rennes, France. In January 2006, he joined the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain, as a Ramón-y-Cajal researcher, where he is currently associate professor in the area of remote sensing and microwave technology.

His research interests include SAR and multidimensional SAR, radar polarimetry, physical parameter inversion, digital signal processing, estimation theory and harmonic analysis. He is associate editor of IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing and he served as guest editor of the EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing. He has organized different invited sessions in international conferences on radar and SAR polarimetry. He has presented advanced courses and seminars on radar polarimetry to a wide range of organizations and events. Dr. López-Martínez has authored or coauthored more than 100 articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings in the Radar Remote Sensing and image analysis literature. He received the Student Prize Paper Award at the EUSAR 2002 Conference and coauthored the paper awarded with the First Place Student Paper Award at the EUSAR 2012 Conference.


Certificate of Recognition


About the Award

The Certificate of Recognition was established to recognize individual who have made significant contributions, within the scope of GRSS, in an area not covered by other awards. The award is considered annually and presented only if a suitable candidate is identified.

The Award Recipient
A Certificate of Recognition is presented to Elena Daganzo Eusebio, Roger Oliva, Sara Nieto, and Philippe Richaume with the citation: “For their successful efforts in working with national authorities in removing radio-frequency interference sources from the protected 1400–1427 MHz EESS band.”

About the Awardees

Elena Daganzo Eusebio received the M.Sc. degree in telecommunication engineering from the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain in 1988. In 1992 she joined the European Space Agency (ESA) at its Operations Center in Darmstadt, Germany, as a Ground Segment Systems Engineer. She was involved in the preparation of the ESA ground segment network to support the launch and operations of several space missions. Since 1996, she has worked at the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA/ESTEC), first as a TT&C and RF System Engineer and then, since 2009, as the Frequency Management Engineer in the Directorate of Earth Observation Programmes. She analyzes the spectrum requirements for future Earth observation missions; addresses interference issues and monitors the evolution of the frequency needs for future missions. She participates in numerous technical committees within the ITU, CEPT, and SFCG. She liaises with National Frequency Management Administrations in order to improve the RF interference environment encountered by ESA’s Earth Observation missions, in particular on the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) spacecraft.

Roger Oliva with Society 
President Melba Crawford. 

Roger Oliva received the M.S degree in telecommunication engineering from the Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Spain; and the M.S. degree in Astronomy (D.E.A) from the Barcelona University, Spain. He has been working in several space and astronomy projects, including Mars Express, astronomical microwave observatories and in the design of advanced telecommunications satellite payloads. Since 2007 he is working as a Calibration Engineer for the European Space Agency, on the Earth Observation satellite SMOS.

Sara Nieto received the B.S. degree in computer science, specializing in information systems development and artificial intelligence from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. She has been a part of the SMOS Operations Team, European Space Astronomy Centre, Madrid, since April 2010, where she provides support on radio frequency interference detection.

 

Philippe Richaume received the engineer degree in computer, electronic, and automatic from the Ecole Supérieure d’Informatique, Electronique et Automatique, Paris, France, in 1990, the M.Sc. degree in computer sciences and artificial intelligence from Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France, in 1991, and the Ph.D. degree in computer sciences and applied mathematics from CNAM, Paris, 1996. For the last 20 years, he has worked in various geophysical laboratories, putting to stress advanced computer science and applied mathematics paradigms against real problems, particularly in the remote sensing context. He is working currently with the Centre d’Etudes Spatiales de la BIOsphère (CESBIO), Toulouse, France. His domains of interest are signal processing, nonlinear modeling and inverse problem, particularly using artificial neural networks such as for real-time signal processing controller of a radio receiver dedicated to solar wind plasma line tracking onboard the WIND/WAVES spacecraft, or for direct-inverse modeling of ocean surface wind from ERS 1/2 scatterometer or biophysical parameters, LAI, chlorophyll, etc., from POLDER optical directional reflectance, or using traditional iterative minimization approaches like for soil moisture retrieval from SMOS brightness temperature he is working on currently.


GRSS Student Prize Paper Awards


The GRSS Student Prize Paper Award was established to recognize the best student papers presented at the IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). It is believed that early recognition of an outstanding paper will encourage the student to strive for greater and continued contributions to the Geoscience and Remote Sensing profession. The award shall be considered annually.

Ten high-quality papers were preselected by the Student Prize Paper Awards Committee in cooperation with the Technical Program Committee. The students presented their papers in a special session and a jury, nominated by the GRSS Awards Co-Chair, evaluated and ranked them for the awards.

GRSS Third Student Prize Paper Award

The Third Prize Paper
Ruzbeh Akbar, “A Radar-Radiometer Surface Soil Moisture Retrieval Algorithm for SMAP.”

About the Winner

Ruzbeh Akbar with Society 
President Melba Crawford. 

Ruzbeh Akbar was born in High Wycombe, United Kingdom, and attended Montgomery Community College in Rockville MD, USA, in 2003. He then received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from The George Washington University, in Washington DC, in 2009. He joined the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor in 2009 and received his M.S. in Electrical Engineering in December 2011 from UM’s Radiation Laboratory.

Following his research groups transition to University of Southern California, Los Angeles, in January 2012, Ruzbeh followed suit and is currently finishing his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering. His primary research interests are forward and inverse Electromagnetic modeling for remote sensing applications, especially soil moisture remote sensing. His current focus is development of radar-radiometer forward and inverse methods for soil moisture remote sensing. This work is directly related to NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive, SMAP, mission scheduled to launch late 2014. His other research interests include in situ vegetation (trees, crops, etc.) dielectric measurements and measurement techniques, electromagnetic scattering models for trees, microwave emission modeling for forested areas. He has also regularly participated in many multi-scale field campaigns, from ground truth collection (CanEx’10 & SMAPVEx’12) to wireless sensor node deployment (SoilSCAPE) and radar measurements (AirMOSS). Ruzbeh is a member of IEEE, IEEE-GRSS and AGU. He is also a recipient of NASA’s Earth and Space Science Fellowship, NESSF, from 2010 till present (2010/11, 2011/12 and 2012/13).

GRSS Second Student Prize Paper Award

The Second Prize Paper
Octavio Ponce, “First Demonstration of 3-D Holographic Tomography with Fully Polarimetric Multi-circular SAR at L-band.”

About the Winner

Octavio Ponce with Society 
President Melba Crawford. 

Octavio Ponce (S’12) was born in Mexico, in 1985. He received the Engineer’s degree (with honors) in telematics engineering from Mexico Autonomous Institute of Technology (ITAM), Mexico, in 2009. He is currently working toward the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering at the Microwaves and Radar Institute, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Wessling, Germany. In 2009, he was with the Astrium, European Aeronautic Defense and Space Company (EADS) GmbH, Germany, designing a high-speed video interface unit for the Fluid Science Laboratory, Columbus Module, International Space Station. In 2007, he was with the Defense and Security, EADS GmbH, Germany, developing software for interpretation and analysis of security system onboard aircraft, i.e., black boxes. His research interests include 3-D high-resolution SAR imaging, new SAR imaging modes, radar signal processing, and future Earth observation space missions.

GRSS Mikio Takagi Student Prize Paper Award

About the Award

The IEEE Mikio Takagi Student Prize was established to recognize a student who has presented an exceptional paper at the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS).

The First Prize Paper
Pedram Ghamisi, “The Spectral Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Images Based on Hidden Markov Random Field and Its Expectation-Maximization.”

About the Winner

Pedram Ghamisi with Society 
President Melba Crawford. 

Pedram Ghamisi (S’13) received the B.Sc. degree in civil (survey) engineering from Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran, and the M.Sc. degree in remote sensing from K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran, in 2012. He is currently working toward the Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. His research interests are remote sensing and image analysis with the current focus on spectral and spatial techniques for hyperspectral image classification. He received the Best Researcher Award for M.Sc. students from K. N. Toosi University of Technology in 2010–2011. He serves as a reviewer for a number of journals including the IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, and IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters.