Distinguished Achievement Award


About the Award
The Distinguished Achievement Award was established to recognize an individual who has made significant technical contributions, within the scope of GRSS, usually over a sustained period. In selecting the individual, the factors considered are quality, significance and impact of the contributions; quantity of the contributions; duration of significant activity; papers published in archival journals; papers presented at conferences and symposia; patents granted; and advancement of the profession. IEEE membership is preferable but not required. The award is considered annually and presented only if a suitable candidate is identified. The awardee receives a plaque and a certificate.

The Award Recipient


Dr. Didier Massonnet from Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse, France:
For contributions to observing earthquake, co-seismic or post-seismic displacements, volcano deformation, natural and artificial subsidence.

Didier Massonnet (right) receives from the GRSS President Jon Atli Benediktsson a plaque and a certificate.

Didier Massonnet spent his entire career within the French Space Agency (CNES). It started with a one-year stay at JPL devoted to the data acquired by the Sir-B mission. Once back and among studies aimed at designing algorithms for Synthetic Aperture Radar image formation or quality measurement on SAR images, he initiated at the end of 1985 a program for developing radar interferometry and differential interferometry. He worked in support of airborne SAR campaigns using the CNES airborne radar (VARAN-S) or the DLR airborne radar (E-SAR), which led to a very fruitful cooperation with DLR. He prepared operational products for the coming ERS-1, notably for ocean studies. At the same time, he prepared investigation programs and tested differential interferometry and related tools, which were finally applied to all the space borne missions of the time (ALMAZ, ERS1-2, SIR-C, J-ERS). Significant results followed, mostly for the first time, in observing earthquake co-seismic of post-seismic displacements, volcano deformation, natural or artificial subsidence or the key role of atmosphere as the main limitation of the technique. A large effort was then put in organizing many training courses worldwide in order to disseminate the technique among non-radar specialists.
In parallel, Didier Massonnet kept a steady activity in the design of SAR systems, such as the Interferometric Cartwheel. He acted as the General Chairman of IGARSS’03 held in Toulouse.
More recently, as the PHARAO project manager, Didier Massonnet leads the ambitious goal of building and testing the best atomic clock ever put in space, in the frame of ESA’s ACES project (Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space). This activity is not unrelated to remote sensing as accurate clocks might become key to mapping the earth gravity potential.


Education Award

About the Award
The GRSS Education Award was established to recognize an individual who has made significant educational contributions in terms of the innovation and extent of its overall impact. A certificate may be presented for recognized contributions to education in geoscience and/or remote sensing. The awardee(s) must be either member(s) or affiliates of the GRSS. The award shall be considered annually, but only awarded when an outstanding recipient is identified.

The Award Recipient

Motoyuki Sato (right) receives the IEEE GRSS Eduction Award from GRSS President Jon Atli Benediktsson.

Motoyuki Sato (S’79-M’80-SM’02-F’10) received the B.E., M.E degrees, and Dr. Eng. degree in information engineering from the Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, in 1980, 1982 and 1985, respectively. Since 1997 he is a professor at Tohoku University and a distinguished professor of Tohoku University since 2007, and he is the Director of Center for Northeast Asian Studies, Tohoku University since 2009. From 1988 to 1989, he was a visiting researcher at the Federal German Institute for Geoscience and Natural Resources (BGR) in Hannover, Germany. His current interests include transient electromagnetics and antennas, radar polarimetry, ground penetrating radar (GPR), borehole radar, electromagnetic induction sensing, interferometric and polarimetric SAR. He has conducted the development of GPR sensors for humanitarian demining, and his sensor ALIS, which is a hand-held dual sensor, has detected more than 80 mines in mine fields in Cambodia since May 2009. He is a visiting Professor at Jilin University, China, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands, and Mongolian University of Science and Technology. Dr. Sato is a member of the GRSS AdCom (2006-) where he is responsible for specialty symposia and Asian issues. He is an associate editor of IEEE GRSS Newsletter, and a guest editor of the special issue of GPR2006 and GPR2010 in Transactions on Geoscience and Remote
Sensing. He was the chair of the IEEE GRSS Japan Chapter (2006-2007). He served as the general chair of IGARSS2011.


GOLD Early Career Award


About the Award

The GRSS Early Career Award is to promote, recognize and support young scientists and engineers within the Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society that have demonstrated outstanding ability and promise for significant contributions in the future. Selection factors include quality, significance and impact of contributions, papers published in archival journals – papers presented at conferences and symposia, patents, demonstration of leadership, and advancement of profession. Previous award winners are ineligible. The Award consists of a Certificate and an honorarium of US$1,500.

The Winner

GOLD Early Career Award recipient Miguel O. Román (right) with GRSS President Jon Benediktsson.

Miguel O. Román received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 2004 from Universidad de Puerto Rico, Recinto Universitario de Mayagüez, Mayagüez, PR, the M.Eng. degree in Systems Engineering in 2005 from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, and the Ph.D. degree in Geography in 2009 from Boston University, Boston MA. Miguel Román is a research physical scientist with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). He is a member of NASA’s Land Product Evaluation and Test Element (PEATE) team in charge of evaluating the operational Land algorithms that are being used for the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite. Dr. Román has also taken the lead for the NASA Land Science community in developing plans and achieving consensus in the areas of global product validation and approaches for producing environmental data records to meet the needs of both the operational (NOAA) and science research (NASA) communities.

Through his participation in several field campaign programs (FLUXNET, NACP, ARM-DoE, and BSRN) and intense observing periods (e.g., ChEAS’06, CLASIC’07, ARCTAS’08, ECO-3D’11), Román has used in situ, airborne, and satellite data to understand the role of reflectance anisotropy (BRDF), scale, and spatial heterogeneity in the retrieval of terrestrial essential climate variables; especially under conditions of seasonal and
rapid surface change.

His research and technical efforts as the Land scientist for NASA’s Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and the BRDF, Albedo, Clouds and Aerosol Radiometer (BACAR) have led to new approaches for global intercomparison of moderate-resolution land science products and the development of new algorithms for the study of the land surface in the context of Climate and Global Change Research. He serves as a reviewer for IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering, Remote Sensing of Environment, Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, and Journal of Hydro-meteorology. He is the recipient of several prestigious awards including the NASA Early Career Achievement Medal (2012).


Certificate of Recognition


About the Award

The Certificate of Recognition was established to recognize individual who have made significant contributions, within the scope of GRSS, in an area not covered by other awards. The award is considered annually and presented only if a suitable candidate is identified.

The Award Recipients

A Certificate of Recognition was presented to Karen St. Germain with the citation: “For her service to the Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society as an elected Member of AdCom for the period 1997 to 2011.”

A Certificate of Recognition was presented to Motoyuki Sato with the citation: “For his service to the Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society as the General Chair of IGARSS 2011.”

About the Awardees
Karen St. Germain (S’88-M’91-SM’03) received the Ph.D. degree from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, in 1993. She is currently the Director of the Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Systems Division, Space and Intelligence Office, U.S. Department of Defense, Washington, DC. Prior to this position, she served as the Acting Deputy Program Director and Program Scientist for the Joint Polar Satellite System, formerly the National Polar-orbiting Operational Satellite System, where she was responsible for ensuring that the JPSS system would produce data of the high quality needed to support the nation’s weather, environment, and climate observation needs. Dr. St. Germain served as the General Co-chair of the 2010 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS) and has been a member of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) since 1988. She was elected to the Administrative Committee in 1997 and has held a number of positions including Associate Editor of the GRSS Newsletter, Membership Chairman, Vice President for Meetings and Symposia, Vice President for Operations and Finance, and Technical Committee Co-Chairman for the 20th Anniversary IGARSS in 2000. She was the Co-chair of the Technical Program for IGARSS 2000. She served on the U.S. National Academy of Sciences National Research Council Committee on Radio Frequencies from 2000 to 2007 and its Chairman from 2005 to 2007.

Motoyuki Sato (S’79–M’80–SM’02–F’10) received the B.E., M.E., and Dr. Eng. degrees in information engineering from the Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, in 1980, 1982, and 1985, respectively. Since 1997, he has been a Professor with Tohoku University, where he has been a Distinguished Professor since 2007 and the Director of the Center for Northeast Asian Studies since 2009. From 1988 to 1989, he was a Visiting Researcher at the Federal German Institute for Geoscience and Natural Resources (BGR), Hannover, Germany. His current research interests include transient electromagnetics and antennas, radar polarimetry, ground penetrating radar (GPR), borehole radar, electromagnetic induction sensing, and interferometric and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar. He has conducted the development of GPR sensors for humanitarian demining, and his sensor Advanced Landmine Imaging System, which is a hand-held dual sensor, has detected more than 30 mines in mine fields in Cambodia since May 2009. He is a Visiting Professor at Jilin University, Changchun, China, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, and Mongolian University of Science and Technology, Ulan Bator, Mongolia. Dr. Sato is a member of the Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society AdCom (2006–) where he is responsible for specialty symposia and Asian issues. He is an Associate Editor of the IEEE GRSS Newsletter and a Guest Editor of the special issue of the GPR2006 and GPR2010 in the IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. He was the Chair of the IEEE GRSS Japan Chapter (2006–2007). He was the General Chair of International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium 2011.


Chapter Excellence Award


About the Award

The GRSS established the Chapter Excellence Award to recognize excellence in a GRSS or Joint Local Chapter demonstrated by exemplary local GRSS activities during the previous year. The award shall be considered annually and presented only when a deserving Chapter is identified. The selection criteria are quantity, quality, breadth and significance of activities and technical meetings during the previous calendar year, active participation of members in IGARSS and other GRSS sponsored activities, and membership growth during the past 3 years. A Chapter that receives the GRSS Chapter Excellence Award is not eligible to receive it again within the next 3 years. The Award consists of a Certificate and an honorarium of $1,000 to be used only for Chapter activities.

The Winner

Western New York Chapter

Jan van Aardt (right), the Chair of the Western New York Chapter, received the Chapter Excellence Award from GRSS President Jon Benediktsson.

 

 


Special Recognition on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the IEEE GRSS


About the Award

A special recognition on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the IEEE GRSS the Society proudly recognized the following individuals who have made a lasting contribution in technical, educational and leadership aspects of the IEEE GRSS.

The Award Recipients
Fawwaz Ulaby, University of Michigan, USA
Werner Wiesbeck, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
Wolfgang-Martin Börner, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

About the Awardees


Fawwaz Ulaby (center) receives the Certificate of Recognition and a handshake from GRSS President Jon Atli Benediktsson, Kamal Sarabandi at the right.
The most significant influence on the Society came for sure from Fawwaz Ulaby. He was the one who initiated the transition from G-GE to GRSS in 1980. Fawwaz explained the situation of G-GE at the end of the 1970ies and the engagement to get GRSS started.

Fawwaz T. Ulaby (M’68–SM’74–F’80) is currently the R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he recently completed a seven-year term as Vice President for Research (1999–2005), with responsibility for a $800 million research enterprise. Since joining the University of Michigan faculty in 1984, he has directed large interdisciplinary NASA projects aimed at the development of high-resolution satellite radar sensors for mapping Earth’s terrestrial environment. He has authored 12 books and published some 600 scientific papers and reports. His undergraduate textbook on applied electromagnetics has been adopted by some 100 universities across the U.S. and a comparable number abroad. Over his 30-year academic career, he has supervised 115 M.S. and Ph.D. graduate students.
Prof. Ulaby is the recipient of numerous awards including the NASA Group Achievement Award (1990), the University of Michigan Regents Medal for Meritorious Service (1996), and the IEEE Millennium Medal (2000). In 2002, he received the William Pecora Award, a joint recognition by NASA and the Department of the Interior, and in 2006, he received the IEEE Thomas Edison Medal, the Distinguished Alumni Award from the American University of Beirut, the Distinguished Educator Award from the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society, and the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Professor of the Year Award from Eta Kappa Nu. He served as the founding Director of a NASA-funded Center for Space Terahertz Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and was founding President of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society, Editor-In-Chief of the Proceedings of the IEEE, and as Vice President for Research at the University of Michigan. He also serves on several national scientific boards and commissions.


Werner Wiesbeck (center) receives the Certificate of Recognition and a handshake from GRSS President Jon Atli Benediktsson, Kamal Sarabandi at the right.
Werner Wiesbeck has as IEEE GRSS President 2000-2001 stimulated the further internationalization and opening of the Society to Europe and Asia Africa and South America. AdCom members from Europe and Asia supported this internationalization and so GRSS became one of the most international Societies in IEEE.

Werner Wiesbeck (Fellow, IEEE) received the Dipl.-Ing. (M.S.E.E.) and Dr.-Ing. (Ph.D.E.E.) degrees from the Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany, in 1969 and 1972, respectively. From 1972 to 1983, he was with AEG-Telefunken in various positions including that of Head of R&D of the Microwave Division, Flensburg, Germany, and Marketing Director Receiver and Direction Finder Division, Ulm, Germany. During this period, he had product responsibility for millimeter-wave radars, receivers, direction finders, and electronic warfare systems. From 1983 to 2007, he was the Director of the Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik und Elektronik (IHE), University of Karlsruhe (TH), Karlsruhe, Germany, where he had been Dean of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and he is now a Distinguished Scientist at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. His research topics include electromagnetics, antennas, wave propagation, communications, radar, and remote sensing. In 1989 and 1994, respectively, he spent a six-month sabbatical at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA.
Dr. Wiesbeck was a member of the IEEE Geoscience & Remote Sensing Society (GRS-S) AdCom (1992-2000), Chairman of the GRS-S Awards Committee (1994-1998, 2002-present), Executive Vice President of the IEEE GRS-S (1998-1999), President of the IEEE GRS-S (2000-2001), an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation (1996-1999), and past Treasurer of the IEEE German Section (1987-1996, 2003-2007). He was General Chairman of the 1988 Heinrich Hertz Centennial Symposium, the 1993 Conference on Microwaves and Optics (MIOP’93), the 2004 Technical Chairman of International Millimeter-Wave and Infrared Conference, Chairman of the 2006 German Microwave Conference GeMIC, and a member of the scientific committees and TPCs of many conferences. He is a member of an Advisory Committee of the EU-Joint Research Centre (Ispra, Italy), and he is an advisor to the German Research Council (DFG), to the Federal German Ministry for Research (BMBF) and to industry in Germany. He is the recipient of a number of awards, lately the IEEE Millennium Award, the IEEE GRS Distinguished Achievement Award, the Honorary Doctorate (Dr. h.c.) from the University Budapest, Hungary, the Honorary Doctorate (Dr.-Ing. E.h.) from the University Duisburg, Germany, the Honorary Doctorate (Dr.-Ing. E.h.) from the Technical University Ilmenau, Germany, and the IEEE Electromagnetics Award 2008. He is an Honorary Life Member of the IEEE GRS-S, a Member of the Heidelberger Academy of Sciences, and a Member of acatech (German Academy of Engineering and Technology)


Wolfgang Börner, replying to the received honor, with his view on the further integration of Remote Sensing in South-East Asia in GRSS.
Wolfgang Börner is a man that never rests. For the Society he is active in recruiting members, initiates Chapter foundations and he is the most successful GRSS Award and IEEE Fellow nominator. His activities span all of South-East Asia and India.

Wolfgang-Martin Börner (SM’75-F’84-LF’92) received the Ph.D. degree from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA, in 1967. From 1967 to 1968, he was with the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. In 1968, he was with the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. Since 1978, he has been a Professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. His research interests include electromagnetic vector inverse scattering, radar polarimetry, polarimetric interferometry, and tomography.
Dr. Boerner is a member of several international scientific societies. He is a Senior Member of CAP, American Society for Engineering Education, ASRSP, and ISRSP, and a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE), American Association for the Advancement of Science, and The Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers. He is a member of the honor society Sigma Xi, the American and German Fulbright Associations, and the Alexander von Humboldt Association.


Transactions Prize Paper Award

About the Award
The GRSS established the Transactions Prize Paper Award to recognize authors who have published an exceptional paper in IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing during the past calendar year. When selecting the paper, other factors considered are originality and clarity of the paper. The Award consists of a Certificate and an honorarium of $3000, equally divided between the authors.

The Winning Paper
Alberto Villa, Jon Atli Benediktsson, Jocelyn Chanussot and Christian Jutten entitled “Hyperspectral Image Classification with Independent Component Discriminant Analysis,” IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 49, no. 12, pp. 4865-4876, December 2011.

About the Authors

Past President Alberto Moreira (left) presented the Transactions Prize Paper Award to Alberto Villa, Jocelyn Chanussot, and Jón Atli Benediktsson; Publications Awards Chair Martti Hallikainen is on the right.

Alberto Villa (S’09) received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electronic engineering from the University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy, in 2005 and 2008, respectively. In 2011, he received the Ph.D. degree (a joint degree) from the Grenoble Institute of Technology (Grenoble INP), Grenoble, France, and the University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. He was a visiting researcher at the Hyperspectral Computing Laboratory (HyperComp), University of Extremadura, Spain, from September 2010 to February 2011. Since July 2011, he has been working as a research engineer for Aresys srl, a spin-off company of Politecnico di Milano in the areas of SAR antenna modeling, spectral unmixing, machine learning, hyperspectral imaging, signal and image processing. He is also an associate with Dipartimento Elettronica ed Informazione (DEI), Politecnico di Milano. He is involved in several projects with European Space Agency and Argentinean Space Agency (CONAE). Dr. Villa is a reviewer for the IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, and IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Signal Processing. He served as a reviewer for several conferences, such as IGARSS 2010-2011, WHISPERS 2009-2011.

Jón Atli Benediktsson received the Cand.Sci. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Iceland, Reykjavik, in 1984, and the M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. degrees from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 1987 and 1990, respectively. He is currently Pro Rector for Academic Affairs and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Iceland. His research interests are in remote sensing, biomedical analysis of signals, pattern recognition, image processing, and signal processing, and he has published extensively in those fields. Prof. Benediktsson is the 2011–2012 President of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) and has been on the GRSS AdCom since 1999. He was Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (TGRS) from 2003 to 2008. Prof. Benediktsson is a co-founder of the biomedical start up company Oxymap. He is a Fellow of the IEEE. He received the Stevan J. Kristof Award from Purdue University in 1991 as outstanding graduate student in remote sensing. In 1997, Dr. Benediktsson was the recipient of the Icelandic Research Council’s Outstanding Young Researcher Award, in 2000, he was granted the IEEE Third Millennium Medal, in 2004, he was a co-recipient of the University of Iceland’s Technology Innovation Award, in 2006 he received the yearly research award from the Engineering Research Institute of the University of Iceland, and in 2007, he received the Outstanding Service Award from the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society. He is a member of Societas Scinetiarum Islandica and Tau Beta Pi.

Jocelyn Chanussot (M’04-SM’04-F’12) received the M.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from the Grenoble Institute of Technology (Grenoble INP), Grenoble, France, in 1995, and the Ph.D. degree from Savoie University, Annecy, France, in 1998. In 1999, he was with the Geography Imagery Perception Laboratory for the Delegation Generale de l’Armement (DGA – French National Defense Department). Since 1999, he has been with Grenoble INP, where he was an Assistant Professor from 1999 to 2005, an Associate Professor from 2005 to 2007, and is currently a Professor of signal and image processing. He is currently conducting his research at the Grenoble Images Speech Signals and Automatics Laboratory (GIPSA-Lab). His research interests include image analysis, multicomponent image processing, nonlinear filtering, and data fusion in remote sensing. Dr. Chanussot is the founding President of IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing French chapter (2007-2010) which received the 2010 IEEE GRSS Chapter Excellence Award “for excellence as a Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society chapter demonstrated by exemplary activities during 2009.” He was the recipient of the NORSIG 2006 Best Student Paper Award, the IEEE GRSS 2011 Symposium Best Paper Award and of the IEEE GRSS 2012 Transactions Prize Paper Award. He was a member of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society AdCom (2009-2010), in charge of membership development. He was the General Chair of the first IEEE GRSS Workshop on Hyperspectral Image and Signal Processing, Evolution in Remote sensing (WHISPERS). He is the Chair (2009-2011) and was the Co-chair of the GRS Data Fusion Technical Committee (2005-2008). He was a member of the Machine Learning for Signal Processing Technical Committee of the IEEE Signal Processing Society (2006-2008) and the Program Chair of the IEEE International Workshop on Machine Learning for Signal Processing, (2009). He was an Associate Editor for the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters (2005-2007) and for Pattern Recognition (2006-2008). Since 2007, he is an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. Since 2011, he is the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing.

Christian Jutten received the PhD degree in 1981 and the Docteur ès Sciences degree in 1987 from the Institut National Polytechnique of Grenoble (France). He taught as associate professor in the Electrical Engineering Department from 1982 to 1989, before to become full professor in University Joseph Fourier of Grenoble, more precisely in the sciences and technologies department: Polytech Grenoble. He was visiting professor in Swiss Federal Polytechnic Institute in Lausanne in 1989 and in Campinas University (Brazil) in 2010. He has been associate director of the Grenoble images, speech, signal and control laboratory (GIPSA, 300 people) and head of the Department Images-Signal (DIS) of this laboratory, from 2007 to 2010. For 30 years, his research interests are blind source separation, independent component analysis and learning in neural networks, including theoretical aspects (separability, source separation in nonlinear mixtures, sparsity) and applications in signal processing (biomedical, seismic, hyperspectral imaging, speech). He is author or co-author of more than 65 papers in international journals, 4 books, 19 invited papers and 150 communications in international conferences. He has been associate editor of IEEE Trans. on Circuits and Systems (1994-95), and co-organizer the 1st International Conference on Blind Signal Separation and Independent Component Analysis (Aussois, France, January 1999). He has been a scientific advisor for signal and images processing at the French Ministry of Research from 1996 to 1998 and for the French National Research Center (CNRS) from 2003 to 2006. He is a member of the technical committee “Blind signal Processing” of the IEEE CAS society and of the technical committee “Machine Learning for signal Processing” of the IEEE SP society. He is a reviewer of main international journals (IEEE Trans. on Signal Processing, IEEE Signal Processing Letters, IEEE Trans. on Neural Networks, Signal Processing, Neural Computation, Neurocomputing, etc.) and conferences in signal processing and neural networks (ICASSP, ISCASS, EUSIPCO, IJCNN, ICA, ESANN, IWANN, etc.). He received the EURASIP best paper award in 1992 and Medal Blondel in 1997 from SEE (French Electrical Engineering society) for his contributions in source separation and independent component analysis, and has been elevated as a Fellow IEEE and a senior Member of Institut Universitaire de France in 2008.


Letters Prize Paper Award

About the Award
The GRSS established the Letters Prize Paper Award to recognize the author(s) who has published in the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters during the previous calendar year an exceptional paper in terms of content and impact on the GRS Society. If a suitable paper cannot be identified from among those published during the calendar year, papers published in prior years, and subsequently recognized as being meritorious, may be considered. When selecting the paper, originality, impact, scientific value and clarity are factors considered. Prize: Certificate and $1500, equally divided between the authors.

The Winning Paper
Diego Reale, Gianfranco Fornaro, Antonio Pauciullo, Xiao Xiang Zhu and Richard Bamler, “Tomographic Imaging and Monitoring of Buildings with Very High Resolution SAR Data,” IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, Vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 661-665, July 2011.

About the Authors


Recipients of the Letters Prize Paper Award Diego Reale (second from left), Xiao Xiang Zhu, Richard Bamler, and Gianfranco Fornaro with GRSS President Jon Benediktsson (left) and Publications Awards Chair Martti Hallikainen (right).

Diego Reale received the degree in telecommunication engineering from the University of Cassino, Italy, in 2007 and the Ph.D in information engineering from the University of Naples ‘Parthenope,’ Naples, in 2011. Since 2006, he is collaborating with the Institute for the Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA) of the Italian National Research Council (CNR), where he is currently a Researcher. His main research interests are framed in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing, particularly in multidimensional SAR tomography, SAR interferometry and Differential SAR Interferometry.

Gianfranco Fornaro (M’06) graduated summa cum laude in Electronic Engineering at the University of Napoli in 1992 and received the Ph.D. degree in 1997. Since 1993 he has been with the Istituto per il Rilevamento Elettromagnetico dell’Ambiente (IREA), formerly IRECE, of the Italian National Research Council (CNR) where he currently holds the position of Senior Researcher. He was also Adjunct Professor of Communication at the Universities of Cassino and Napoli “Federico II” and of Signal Theory at the University of Reggio Calabria. Dr. Fornaro was visiting scientist at the German Aerospace Establishment (DLR), also during the SIR-C/X-SAR mission in 1994, and at Politecnico of Milano and invited lecturer at the Istituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA) in Sao José dos Campos (Brazil) and RESTEC (Tokyo). He was responsible of the remote sensing unit of the Campania Regional Center of Competence “Analysis and Monitoring of the Environmental Risk.” He has authored more than 100 papers in international peer-review journals and proceedings of international conferences in the SAR processing field. He served as an editor of the Advances in Interferometric SAR Processing special issue of the EURASIP Journal on Applied Signal Processing (JASP). His main research interests regards the signal processing field with applications to airborne and spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data processing, SAR Interferometry, differential SAR Interferometry and 3D and 4D SAR focusing. Dr. Fornaro was awarded in 1997 of the Mountbatten Premium by the Institution of Electrical Engineers (IEE).

Antonio Pauciullo was born in Cercola, Italy, on October 10, 1969. He received the Dr. Eng. degree with honors in 1998 and the Ph.D. degree in information engineering in 2003, both from the University of Naples, Italy. Since 2001, he has been with the Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA) of the Italian National Research Council (CNR), where he holds a position of Researcher, and since 2004, he has been an Adjunct Professor of digital signal processing at the University of Cassino (Italy). His current research interests regard the field of statistical signal processing with emphasis on synthetic aperture radar processing and CDMA systems.

Xiao Xiang Zhu (S’10-M’12) received the Bachelor degree in space engineering from the National University of Defense Technology (NUDT), Changsha, China, in 2006. She received the Master (M.Sc.) degree and her Doctor of Engineering (Dr.-Ing.) degree from Technische Universität München (TUM), München, Germany, in 2008 and 2011, respectively. Her Ph.D. dissertation “Very High Resolution Tomographic SAR Inversion for Urban Infrastructure Monitoring – A Sparse and Nonlinear Tour” won the Dimitri N. Chorofas Foundation Research Award in 2011 for its distinguished innovative and sustainability. In October/November 2009, she was a guest scientist at the Italian National Research Council (CNR) – Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA), Naples, Italy. Since May 2011, she has been a full-time scientific collaborator with the Remote Sensing Technology Institute, German Aerospace Center (DLR) and with Remote Sensing Technology Department, TUM. Her main research interests are advanced InSAR techniques such as high dimensional SAR imaging and SqueeSAR, computer vision in remote sensing including object reconstruction and multidimensional data visualization, and modern signal processing, including innovative algorithms such as compressive sensing and sparse reconstruction, with applications in the field of remote sensing.

Richard Bamler (M’95-SM’00-F’05) received his Diploma degree in Electrical Engineering, his Doctorate in Engineering, and his “Habilitation” in the field of signal and systems theory in 1980, 1986, and 1988, respectively, from the Technische Universitält München, Germany. He worked at the university from 1981 to 1989 on optical signal processing, holography, wave propagation, and tomography. He joined the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, in 1989, where he is currently the Director of the Remote Sensing Technology Institute. In early 1994, Richard Bamler was a visiting scientist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in preparation of the SIR-C/X-SAR missions, and in 1996 he was guest professor at the University of Innsbruck. Since 2003 he has held a full professorship in remote sensing technology at the Technische Universität München as a double appointment with his DLR position. His teaching activities include university lectures and courses on signal processing, estimation theory, and SAR. Since 2010 he has been a member of the executive board of Munich Aerospace, a newly founded research and education project between Munich universities and extramural research institutions, incl. DLR. Since he joined DLR Richard Bamler, his team, and his institute have been working on SAR and optical remote sensing, image analysis and understanding, stereo reconstruction, computer vision, ocean color, passive and active atmospheric sounding, and laboratory spectrometry. They were and are responsible for the development of the operational processors for SIR-C/X-SAR, SRTM, TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X, ERS-2/GOME, ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY, MetOp/GOME-2, and EnMAP. Richard Bamler’s current research interests are in algorithms for optimum information extraction from remote sensing data with emphasis on SAR. This involves new estimation algorithms, like sparse reconstruction and compressive sensing. He has devised several high-precision algorithms for SAR processing, SAR calibration and product validation, GMTI for traffic monitoring, SAR interferometry, phase unwrapping, persistent scatterer interferometry, and differential SAR tomography. Richard Bamler is the author of more than 200 scientific publications, among them 50 journal papers, a book on multidimensional linear systems theory, and holds eight patents and patent applications in remote sensing.


J-STARS Prize Paper Award

About the Award

The GRSS established the J-STARS Prize Paper Award to recognize the author(s) who published in the IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing during the previous calendar year an exceptional paper in terms of content and impact on the GRS Society. When selecting the paper, other factors considered are originality, clarity and timeliness of the paper. IEEE membership is preferable. The Award consists of a Certificate and an honorarium of $1,500. If the paper has more than one author, the honorarium shall be shared.

The Winning Paper
Daniele Perissin and Teng Wang, “Time-Series InSAR Applications over Urban Areas in China,” IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 92-100, March 2011.

About the Authors


J-STARS Prize Paper Award recipient Daniele Perissin with GRSS President Jon Benediktsson (left) and Publications Awards Chair Martti Hallikainen (right).

Daniele Perissin was born in Milan, Italy, in 1977. He received the M.S. degree in telecommunications engineering and the Ph.D. degree in information technology from Politecnico di Milano in 2002 and 2006, respectively. He joined the Signal Processing research group at Politecnico di Milano in 2002, and since then, he has been working on the Permanent Scatterers technique (PSInSAR) in the framework of radar remote sensing. Since October 2009 he holds a position as Research Assistant Professor in the Institute of Space and Earth Information Science (ISEIS) in the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK). He is author of a patent on the use of urban dihedral reflectors for combining multisensor synthetic aperture radar data, and he is the developer of the software SARPROZ.

Teng Wang was born at Xinxiang, China, in 1980. He received the M.Eng. Degree in photogrammetry and remote sensing from Wuhan University, Wuhan, China, in 2006 and the Ph.D. Degree in information technology from the State Key Laboratory for Information Engineering in Surveying, Mapping and Remote Sensing, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China and Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione, Politecnico di Milano, Milan Italy in 2010. Since October 2010, he works as a post-doc researcher in the Earth and Environmental Sciences and Engineering Program, Division of Physical Sciences and Engineering at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia. His current research interests include time-series InSAR technique and its applications in geophysical fields.


Highest Impact Paper Award


About the Award

The GRSS established the GRSS Highest Impact Paper Award to recognize the author(s) who has published during the past five years in an IEEE GRSS Journal the scientific paper that has received the highest number of citations and impact over the past five years as measured by the Thomson Reuters Web of Science citation index. A previously selected paper shall not be eligible for this award in the following years. The Award consists of a Certificate and an honorarium of $3,000. If the paper has more than one author, the honorarium shall be shared.

The Winning Paper
Lidan Miao and Hairong Qi, “Endmember Extraction from Highly Mixed Data Using Minimum Volume Constrained Nonnegative Matrix Factorization,” IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 45, no. 3, pp. 765-777, March 2007.

About the Authors

Lidan Miao received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Sichuan University, Chengdu, China, in 2000 and 2003, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in computer engineering from University of Tennessee, Knoxville in 2007. She is currently a software engineer at Microsoft. Her research interests include signal and image processing, pattern recognition and remote sensing. Dr. Miao won the Best Paper Award at the 18th International Conference on Pattern Recognition and is the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award for Extraordinary Professional Promise.

Hairong Qi (S’97-M’99-SM’05) received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in computer science from Northern JiaoTong University, Beijing, China in 1992 and 1995 respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in computer engineering from North Carolina State University, Raleigh, in 1999. She is currently a Professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her current research interests are in advanced imaging and collaborative processing in resource-constrained distributed environment, hyperspectral image analysis, and bioinformatics. She has published over 100 technical papers in archival journals and refereed conference proceedings, including a co-authored book in Machine Vision. She serves on the editorial board of Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology and is the Associate Editor for Computers in Biology and Medicine. Dr. Qi is the recipient of the NSF CAREER Award and the Chancellor’s Award for Professional Promise in Research and Creative Achievement. She also received the Best Paper Award at the 18th International Conference on Pattern Recognition and the 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Distributed Smart Cameras.


Symposium Prize Paper Award


About the Award
The GRSS established the Symposium Prize Paper Award to recognize the author(s) who presented at the IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS) an exceptional paper in terms of content and impact on the GRSS. In selecting the paper, other factors considered are originality, clarity and timeliness of the paper. The published versions of the papers in the Digest shall also be evaluated. Prize: Certificate and $1250, equally divided between the authors.

The Winning Paper
Brian P. Salmon, Waldo Kleynhans, Frans van den Bergh, Jan C. Olivier, Willem J. Marais and Konrad J. Wessels, “Meta-Optimization of the Extended Kalman Filter’s Parameters for Improved Feature Extraction on Hyper-Temporal Images,” presented at the 2011 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, July 2011, in Vancouver, IGARSS’11 Proceedings.

About the Authors


Symposium Prize Paper Award recipients Brian Salmon (second from left), Waldo Kleynhans, Frans van der Bergh, and Jan Olivier with GRSS President Jon Benediktsson (left) and Publications Awards Chair Martti Hallikainen (right).

Brian P. Salmon received the B.Eng degree in computer engineering and the M.Eng degree in electronic engineering (signal processing) from the University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa in 2004 and 2008, respectively. He is currently with the Remote Sensing Research Unit at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. He is working towards a Ph.D. in electronic engineering and his research interests are machine learning and graph theory.

Waldo Kleynhans received the B.Eng., M.Eng. and Ph.D. (Electronic Engineering) from the University of Pretoria, South Africa, in 2004, 2008 and 2011, respectively. He is currently a senior researcher with the Remote Sensing Research Unit at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research in Pretoria, South Africa. His research interests include remote sensing, time-series analysis, wireless communications, statistical detection and estimation theory, and machine learning.

Frans van den Bergh received the M.Sc. degree in computer science (machine vision) and the Ph.D. degree in computer science (particle swarm optimization) from the University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa, in 2000 and 2002, respectively. He is currently a principal researcher at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. His research interests include automated feature extraction from high-resolution satellite images, as well as automated change detection. He maintains an active interest in particle swarm optimization and machine learning.

Jan C. Olivier is a Professor of Engineering at the University of Tasmania in Australia. He was with Bell Northern Research in Ottawa Canada, Nokia Research Center in the United States, and the University of Pretoria in South Africa. He is an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communication Letters and apast editor of the IEEE Trans. on Wireless Communications. His research interests are in the theory of estimation and detection applied to Remote Sensing and Communications theory.

Willem J. Marais received the B.Eng in computer engineering from the University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa in 2005. He is currently doing the M.Sc. in electrical engineering at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His research interests include signal processing in the domain of remote sensing.

Konrad J. Wessels received the M.Sc. in Landscape Ecology and Conservation Planning from the University of Pretoria (South Africa) in 1997 and a Ph.D. in Geography from University of Maryland (US) in 2005. He was a research associate at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Hydrospheric and Biospheric Laboratory (2005–2006). He is presently a principal researcher and leads the Remote Sensing Research Unit within the CSIR Meraka Institute in Pretoria, South Africa. His research interests include time-series analysis of satellite data for monitoring environmental change and the estimation ecosystem state variables and services with remote sensing.


Interactive Session Prize Paper Award


About the Award
The GRSS established the Interactive Session Prize Paper Award to recognize the author(s) who posted at the GRSS Symposium (IGARSS) an exceptional paper in terms of content and impact on the GRSS. When selecting the paper, other factors considered are originality, clarity and timeliness of the paper. The published versions of the papers in the Digest shall also be evaluated. Prize: Certificate and $1250, equally divided between the authors.

The Winning Paper
Alain Bergeron, Linda Marchese, Bernd Harnisch, Martin Suess, Michel Doucet, Pascal Bourqui, Mathieu Legros, Nichola Desnoyers, Ludovic Guillot, Luc Mercier, Maxime Savard, Anne Martel, and François Châteauneuf, “Clustering of Detected Changes in Satellite Imagery Using Fuzzy C-Means Algorithm,” presented at the 2011 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, July 2011 in Vancouver, IGARSS’11 Proceedings.

About the Authors


Interactive Session Prize Paper Award recipients Alain Bergeron (second from left), Linda Marchese, and Martin Suess with GRSS President Jon Benediktsson (left) and Publications Awards Chair Martti Hallikainen (right).

Alain Bergeron has been involved in the development of optical systems for defense and civilian applications for the past 23 years. Among other work, he is involved in the development of optical correlators, infrared & terahertz systems, synthetic aperture radar processors and synthetic aperture lidar sensors. As a professional engineer, Dr. Bergeron also holds Ph.D. in Physics from Laval University. He is now Defense & Security Program Manager at INO in Québec City, Canada.

Linda Marchese has been involved in the development of optical systems for defense and civilian applications for the past 14 years. She joined INO in 2006 and since then has participated in the development of synthetic aperture radar processing systems, terahertz imagers, and infrared cameras, including New Infrared Sensor Technology flying on SAC-D/Aquarius. Dr. Marchese holds a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineer ing from the University of Rochester.

Bernd Harnisch works as optical engineer in the optics section at the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) of the European Space Agency (ESA) at Noordwijk in the Netherlands. He is working on new technology developments for optical payloads and is supporting space projects like the NIRSpec instrument payload development for the European contribution to the JWST telescope.

Martin Suess is currently the Head of the On-Board Payload Data Processing Section at the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) of the European Space Agency (ESA) at Noordwijk in the Netherlands. He and his group are working on payload data processing systems and technologies for satellite missions in the field of Earth observation, planetary, and deep- space exploration. Some of his particular interests are SAR processing, new SAR system concepts and architectures and radar instrument technologies. He is member IEEE where he serves as co-chairman of the Technical Committee for Instrumentation and Future Technology in the Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society.

Michel Doucet has been actively involved in optical design and optics since 1991. He has participated in the design of many optical systems for Military, Security, Medical, Aerospace, Industrial, Telecommunication and Environmental Applications at INO. M. Doucet holds a Master degree in Optics from Laval University and a Bachelor degree in Physics from Université du Québec à Chicoutimi. He is currently a senior optical designer at INO.

Pascal Bourqui has been actively involved since 1997 in computer vision and system engineering. He has participated in the development of three generations of optical computing platforms and many R&D projects at INO. M. Bourqui holds a Master degree in Telecommunication from INRS-Telecommunication (Montreal, Canada) and a Bachelor degree in Electrical Engineering from Laval University (Quebec City, Canada). He is currently the leader of the Computer Vision Group at INO.

Mathieu Legros has been actively involved in optomechanical design since 2008. He has participated in the development of many optical systems for Military, Security, Aerospace, Industrial, Telecommunication and Environmental Applications at INO. M. Legros hold a Bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering from Laval University. He is currently an optomechanical designer for the optomechanical department of INO, Québec City, Canada.

Nichola Desnoyers has been actively involved in optomechanical design since 1995. He has participated in the development of more than fifty optical systems for Military, Security, Medical, Aerospace, Industrial, Telecommunication and Environmental Applications at INO. M. Desnoyers holds a Master degree in Optomechanical Engineering and a Bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering from Laval University. He is currently the leader of the Optomechanical Group at INO.

Ludovic Guillot has been involved in several project management roles both in R&D and manufacturing. He has been involved as a project manager in several Military, Security and Aerospace Applications at INO. Mr. Guillot holds a Bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering from Laval University.

Luc Mercier has been actively involved in electronics design since 1999. He has participated in the development of more than twenty systems for Military, Security, Telecommunication and Industrial Applications at INO. Mr. Mercier holds a Bachelor degree in Electrical Engineering from Université de Sherbrooke. He is currently a researcher of the Optoelectronics Group at INO.

Maxime Savard has been actively involved in optomechanical design since 1997. He has participated in the development, assembly and alignment of hundreds of optical systems for Defense, Security, Aerospace, Industrial, Telecommunication, and Environmental Applications at INO. M. Savard holds a D.E.C in optics from Cegep De La Pocatiere. He is currently a senior technologist in the optical design group.

Anne Martel specializes in highly complex optical systems and has been involved in the development several optical systems for defense, civilian and space applications. She is currently with INO, Québec city, Canada, where she has been actively involved in optical design as a technologist since 2000.

François Châteauneuf has been involved in the development of optical payloads for space applications for the past 13 years. Among others, he was part of the development team of the Cross-track Infrared Sounder flying on NPEOSS, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer flying on SciSat-1 and the New Infrared Sensor Technology flying on SAC-D/Aquarius. Dr. Châteauneuf holds a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Laval University and a D.Sc. in Chemical Physics from Université Paris-Sud. He is now the Manager of the Environment program at INO.


GRSS Student Prize Paper Awards


The GRSS Student Prize Paper Award was established to recognize the best student papers presented at the IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). It is believed that early recognition of an outstanding paper will encourage the student to strive for greater and continued contributions to the Geoscience and Remote Sensing profession. The award shall be considered annually.

Ten high-quality papers were preselected by the Student Prize Paper Awards Committee in cooperation with the Technical Program Committee. At IGARSS 2012 in Munich the students presented their papers in a special session and a jury, nominated by the GRSS Awards Co-Chair, evaluated and ranked them for the awards.

The Winners

Student Prize Paper Award recipients Umamahesh Srinivas (second from left), Emma Izquierdo-Verdiguier, and Hongkun Li with GRSS President Jon Benediktsson (left) and Publications Awards Chair Martti Hallikainen (right).

GRSS Third Student Prize Paper Award

The Third Prize Paper
Hongkun Li, “Sea Surface Infrared Emissivity with Surface Reflection.”

About the Winner

Hongkun Li was born in Guangdong, China, on July 21, 1984. He received the Master degree in Electronics from the University of Nantes in France in 2009, and is now a Ph.D student (third year) in the IETR (Institut d’Électronique et de Télécommunications de Rennes) Laboratory, University of Nantes, Nantes, France. He is now working on problems of emission and reflection from rough sea surfaces in the infrared band. His advisor is Christophe Bourlier from the University of Nantes.

GRSS Second Student Prize Paper Award

The Second Prize Paper
Emma Izquierdo-Verdiguier, “Semisupervised Nonlinear Feature Extraction for Image Classification.”

About the Winner

Emma Izquierdo-Verdiguier (S’12) received the B.Sc. degree in physics and the M.Sc. degree in remote sensing from the University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain, where she is currently working toward the Ph.D. degree with the Image Processing Laboratory. Her research interests are nonlinear feature extraction based on graphs and kernel methods. Previously she worked on automatic identification and classification of multispectral images. Her advisor is Gustavo Camps-Valls from University of Valencia.

GRSS Mikio Takagi Student Prize Paper Award

About the Award

The IEEE Mikio Takagi Student Prize was established to recognize a student who has presented an exceptional paper at the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS).

The First Prize Paper
Umamahesh Srinivas, “Discriminative Graphical Models for Sparsity-Based Hyperspectral Target Detection.”

About the Winner
Umamahesh Srinivas (S’10) received the B.Tech degree in electronics and communication from National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, India in 2007 and the M.S. degree in electrical engineering from The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA in 2009. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in electrical engineering at Penn State. His research interests are broadly in statistical learning and computational color and imaging. His advisor is Vishal Monga from Pennsylvania State University.